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10 Scariest Bridges in the World you can walk on

People learned to build bridges many centuries ago. At first, they were questionable constructions made of stones, wood, and even tree roots. But nowadays, bridges have turned into magnificent structures able to withstand huge strain.

Made of steel, cement, cable, and even glass, some of them stretch for miles over mountains, lakes, and rivers. And still, some bridges are so bizarre and scary that not everyone would dare to step on them! Here are 10 Scariest Bridges in the world you can walk on:

1. Chesapeake Bay Bridge, Maryland.

This bridge, which connects the Eastern and Western shores of Maryland, has been called “the scariest bridge in America.” At first sight, it’s hard to understand why this beautiful design has such an unflattering name.

Chesapeake Bay Bridge - The scariest bridge in America
Chesapeake Bay Bridge – The scariest bridge in America

And you will keep wondering until you reach the 4.3-mile-long bridge and start driving over it. The construction looms 186 ft above the water’s surface, and they say that when the weather is bad, you can’t see the shore from the middle of the bridge.

Chesapeake Bay Bridge
Chesapeake Bay Bridge

All things combined, it creates an eerie feeling of being suspended in some kind of nerve-racking limbo. But there’s no need to panic: you can pay $30, and a special transfer service will drive your car to the other side of the bridge instead of you!

2. Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia.

At 410 ft long, this is the longest curved suspension bridge in the world. The deck of Sky Bridge is 2,170 ft above sea level, among the mountain peaks, and boy, that’s a sight to behold!

Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia - The longest curved suspension bridge
Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia – The longest curved suspension bridge

The most amazing thing about this bridge, though, is that in the middle, one section of the floor is replaced with glass so that you can see the trees far below. Besides, the bridge, which hangs at the height of about 330 ft above the ground, is suspended from a single 270-ft-tall pylon and is kept in place by only 8 cables!

3. Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado.

This bridge held the title of the world’s highest from 1929, when it was completed, till 2001, when Liuguanghe Bridge in China surpassed it by 19 ft. But even now, it’s still the highest bridge in the US. And no wonder! After all, it stretches to the height of 955 ft above the raging waters of the Arkansas River.

Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado - The highest bridge in the US
Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado – The highest bridge in the US

Cars can travel across Royal Gorge Bridge during its opening hours, but trucks and buses aren’t allowed to use it. As for pedestrians, everyone can enjoy a walk across this steel construction covered with 1,292 wooden planks. And if the breathtaking height of the bridge isn’t thrilling enough, you can always try bungee jumping!

4. Millau Viaduct, France.

The tallest bridge in the world seems to be floating over the river Tarn’s gorge valley in southern France. The total length of the bridge is 8,070 ft, and its maximum height is a whopping 1,125 ft above the ground! This almost $445 million project still remains one of the most impressive engineering achievements of all times.

Millau Viaduct, France - The tallest bridge in the world
Millau Viaduct, France – The tallest bridge in the world

The highest point of the bridge is 62 ft taller than the Eiffel Tower! That’s why, when it’s foggy, drivers have the distinct feeling of driving over the clouds. By the way, recently the speed limit on the bridge has been reduced from 81 to 68 miles per hour. Too many travelers were slowing down on Millau Viaduct to take pictures.

5. U Bein Bridge, Myanmar.

This is one of the longest and oldest teakwood footbridges in the world. Besides, it’s probably one of the most photographed as well! There’s a lot of history behind U Bein Bridge. It was built around 1850 from the wood taken from the former royal palace! At 3,967 ft long, the bridge curves over the surface of Taungthaman Lake and is especially popular in July and August, when the water level in the lake is at its highest.

U Bein Bridge, Myanmar - One of the oldest teakwood footbridges
U Bein Bridge, Myanmar – One of the oldest teakwood footbridges

Unfortunately, nowadays, the 1,086 pillars of the bridge have grown pretty old and started to decay. Even more, some of them have already detached from the bases and remain in place only thanks to the bars which hold the pillars together. Hmm… It sounds precarious. Would you risk walking over this unique bridge? Sound off in the comments below!

6. Hongyagu Glass Bridge, China.

If you’re a fan of nail-biting entertainment, you should add this bridge to your bucket list. The world’s longest glass bridge, opened in 2017, hangs over a picturesque canyon in the Hebei province of China. About 1,600 ft long and more than 700 ft high, the bridge is paved with 1,077 glass panels!

Hongyagu Glass Bridge, China - The world's longest glass bridge
Hongyagu Glass Bridge, China – The world’s longest glass bridge

Yep, it means that the bottom of the bridge is transparent, and you can easily imagine that you’re walking on air! The bridge even has intriguing “special effects”! Picture this: you’re walking at the height of a 66-story building when the bridge starts to sway! Well, it’s all thanks to the suspension cables which make the construction move to entertain tourists.

7. Walk of Faith, Tianmen Mountain, China.

I feel dizzy just looking at this glass bridge hanging from the side of a cliff 4,690 ft above the ground! The walkway isn’t particularly long, only 200 ft, but the view that is waiting is breathtaking. Everyone using the pathway has to wear special anti-slip shoe covers.

Walk of Faith, Tianmen Mountain, China - Walk of Faith (another glass bridge)
Walk of Faith, Tianmen Mountain, China – Walk of Faith (another glass bridge)

Surprisingly, their main purpose is to keep the glass clean, not to prevent you from, you know, slipping. So, if you have nerves of steel, this adventure is exactly what you need! If not, luckily, Tianmen Mountain National Forest Park is often covered with a thick layer of fog which effectively masks the abyss beneath your feet.

8. Eshima Ohashi Bridge.

This is the largest rigid-frame bridge in Japan, even though it looks more like a twisted roller coaster for drivers! The structure has incredibly steep inclines on both sides, and at first sight, you may doubt that a regular car is able to climb the bridge.

Eshima Ohashi Bridge - The largest rigid-frame bridge
Eshima Ohashi Bridge – The largest rigid-frame bridge

The reason for building such a steep construction to allow big ships and boats to pass underneath. It’s almost 145 ft high and about 1 mile long. Uh-oh, imagine driving over this bridge during a rainstorm, and you’ll have driver nightmares for ages!

9. Storseisundet Bridge, Norway.

The locals call this construction “the drunk bridge,” and you can probably see why! Its length is only 850 ft, but the curve of the bridge that protrudes over the Norwegian Sea plays a funny visual trick on motorists.

Storseisundet Bridge, Norway - The Drunk Bridge
Storseisundet Bridge, Norway – The Drunk Bridge

When you’re approaching the structure, it seems that the bridge leads to nowhere! However, it’s just an optical illusion created by the span of the bridge! On the other hand, the construction can be hazardous in nasty weather, and THAT is not a joke.

10. Seven Mile Bridge, USA.

Interestingly, there are not one, but two bridges in that location. The modern version of the Seven Mile Bridge was completed in 1982, and its construction cost was about $45 million.

Seven Mile Bridge, USA - Seven Mile Bridge
Seven Mile Bridge, USA – Seven Mile Bridge

When the 6.7-mile-long bridge was finished, it was among the world’s longest bridges. But alongside the new one, there’s another, much older bridge. Its construction was finished in 1912, and the bridge operated till 1935 when Labor Day Hurricane severely damaged it. Nowadays, only cyclists and pedestrians can use it.

What is the most impressive bridge you’ve ever visited? Sound off in the comments below! Remember to rate this article “10 Scariest Bridges in the World you can walk on” by Bright Side and share it with your friends!

Credit: Bright Side

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